Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

RYAN v. HARD.

decided: May 16, 1892.

RYAN
v.
HARD.



APPEAL FROM THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE UNITED STATES FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF NEW YORK.

Author: Blatchford

[ 145 U.S. Page 242]

MR. JUSTICE BLATCHFORD delivered the opinion of the court.

 This is a suit in equity, brought April 7, 1887, in the Circuit Court of the United States for the Northern District of New York, by James B. Ryan, Francis A. Hall, William R. Cougle and Richard W. Elliott, against Charles H. Hard, John J. Crawford and Henry D. Hard, for an alleged infringement of letters patent No. 241,321, granted May 10, 1881, to Charles H. Dunks and James B. Ryan for improvements in swing woven-wire bed-bottoms. The alleged infringement consisted in the sale by the defendants of woven-wire bed-bottoms, containing the patented improvements. The answer of the defendants set up, among other things, the want of novelty and of patentability. Issue was joined and proofs were taken, and the Circuit Court, held by Judge Coxe, on August 13, 1888, gave an opinion in favor of the defendants, (35 Fed. Rep. 831,) in pursuance of which a decree was entered dismissing the bill.

The specification of the patent says:

"C represents a central section of the ordinary woven-wire fabric in common use in bed-bottoms. This fabric is attached, at either or both ends, to a swinging cross-bar, which, in turn, is suspended from one of the end rails of the bedstead. By preference we construct the swinging bar in two parts -- a lower portion, D, formed of wood, to which one end of the woven fabric is secured by means of suitable pins, or otherwise, and an upper portion, D', provided upon its outer edge with a series of holes, d, the upper and lower portions being secured to each other by rivets, bolts or other analogous devices. Thus the upper part may be made to assist in securing the end of the woven fabric, to cover the end of the fabric, and thus protect the mattress from undue wear, and also as a means by which to attach the springs E, links or other devices employed to connect said swinging bar with the end rail of the bedstead.

"E E represent a series of spiral springs, each connected at one end to the swinging bar, and at the other end to the end

[ 145 U.S. Page 243]

     rail of the bedstead, preferably by means of an interposed supplemental bar or rail, F, which, in this instance, we have represented as being a metal bar provided with holes upon one edge for the attachment of the springs, and provided, also, upon the other edge with holes, f, adapted to receive pins, by means of which said bar F can be attached, either to the end rail of the bedstead or to a separate rail, G, which, in turn, is secured to the end rail of the bedstead.

"In Fig. 1 we have shown both methods of attaching the bar F to the bedstead, it being attached to the foot-rail B' by means of a series of bolts, hooks or pins, b; and in case pins are inserted in the rail B' for this purpose, we prefer to incline them backward, in order to prevent the bar F from being accidentally detached when in use; or the pins may be provided with heads, the holes in the end rail of the bedstead being inclined inwardly at their lower ends, when the tension of the springs E will keep the form in position.

"When the bar G is employed its ends may be notched to engage with the vertical posts of the bedstead, or with cleats or ribs secured to the inner faces of the posts or of the side rails, as the construction of the bedstead shall indicate as being most convenient; or the end rail of the bedstead may be provided with an inwardly projecting rib having pins or hooks corresponding to those marked b; or hooks may be attached to and project from the inner face of the rail in proper position to receive the bar F.

"Referring to Fig. 4, H H are the side rails, and I I' the end rails, of a bed-bottom adapted to be applied to a bedstead of any ordinary or approved construction, and rest upon the cleats with which such bedsteads are usually provided for the purpose of supporting a detachable bed-bottom.

"In this construction we prefer to dispense with the supplemental rail G and attach the bars F directly to the end rails, I I' in such manner as to be readily detached therefrom, in order to facilitate the rolling up of the spring portions for transportation.

"By an examination of the drawings it will be seen that the cut ends of the woven-wire fabric ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.