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SULLY v. AMERICAN NATIONAL BANK.

decided: May 28, 1900.

SULLY
v.
AMERICAN NATIONAL BANK.



ERROR TO THE SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF TENNESSEE.

Author: PECKHAM

[ 178 U.S. Page 296]

 MR. JUSTICE PECKHAM, after making the foregoing statement, delivered the opinion of the court.

There are two classes of creditors before the court, both of whom insist upon the erroneous character of the decree of the Supreme Court of the State. They are (a) general unsecured and non-resident creditors, and (b) non-resident creditors, who are also mortgagees. The creditors suing out this writ of error are all non-residents of the State of Tennessee, and they claim to have been illegally discriminated against in the courts below by reason of the statute of Tennessee providing for preferences to Tennessee creditors.

In regard to the unsecured non-resident creditors, objection is first made that there is only one of them, A. B. Carhart, who can be heard upon the question of the validity of the act of 1877, because he is the only person who has raised the point in any of the state courts. It is also claimed that the question was raised too late even by Carhart himself, inasmuch as it is alleged to have been raised by him for the first time in the Supreme Court of the State.

[ 178 U.S. Page 297]

     In reply to the first objection, it is urged on the part of creditors, other than Carhart, that they are general creditors in like class with him, and that if he can raise the question they are entitled to participate with him in the benefits of a decision thereof in his favor, to the same extent as if they had each personally raised the same question in the state court.

Cases are cited by counsel for these creditors from the courts of Tennessee, in which they say it has been held that "a broad appeal by any one party from an entire chancery decree, where the matter is purely of equitable cognizance, carries up the whole case so as to allow relief to be granted to those who do not appeal;" and it is said that Carhart made a broad appeal.

In reply, counsel for defendants in error say that the rule in Tennessee is that an appeal by an antagonistic party, even though a broad one, will not avail his opponent. It is also argued that the other creditors cannot be heard under Carhart's appeal, because the interests of such other creditors are not joint or common with him, but they are simply interested in the same question, which has never been held sufficient.

However it may be in regard to the rights of parties on appeal in the state court, we think that in order to be heard in this court the question must have been raised in the state court by the individual who seeks to have it reviewed here. A plaintiff in error in this court must show that he has himself raised the question in the state court which he argues here, and it will not aid him to show that some one else has raised it in the state court, while he failed himself to do so.

The two plaintiffs in error here, Sully, as the assignee of Manning, and Mrs. Myton, failed to appeal from the decree of the chancellor, as well as from the decree of the Court of Chancery Appeals, nor did they except to the report of the master, nor to the decree affirming it, and their first mention of the point in their own behalf is after the decision of the state Supreme Court.

This is not a case where, by the reversal of a decree at the instance of those who particularly raised the question in the courts below, the whole decree is opened and nullified so as to necessarily let in all parties standing in the same position to

[ 178 U.S. Page 298]

     share in the benefits of the decision. The fund is to be distributed in this case according to the decision of the court; and of the parties to this suit, those only can avail themselves of the benefits of the decree who have properly raised the question and in whose favor the decree is rendered.

We must hold, therefore, that neither Sully, as assignee of Manning, nor Mrs. Myton is in a position to raise the question of ...


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