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JASON. *FN1

decided: May 13, 1912.

THE JASON.*FN1


ON CERTIFICATE FROM THE UNITED STATES CIRCUIT COURT OF APPEALS FOR THE SECOND CIRCUIT.

Author: Pitney

[ 225 U.S. Page 48]

 MR. JUSTICE PITNEY, after stating the case as above, delivered the opinion of the court.

That the facts present a case of general average within the meaning of the clause embodied in the bills of lading is entirely clear. There was a common, imminent peril

[ 225 U.S. Page 49]

     involving ship and cargo, followed by a voluntary and extraordinary sacrifice of property (including extraordinary expenses), necessarily made to avert the peril, and a resulting common benefit to the adventure. McAndrews v. Thatcher, 3 Wall. 347, 365; Star of Hope, 9 Wall. 203, 228; Ralli v. Troop, 157 U.S. 386, 394.

The principal controversy is upon the question of the validity of the agreement that if the shipowner "shall have exercised due diligence to make said ship in all respects seaworthy, and properly manned, equipped and supplied," then, in case of danger, damage, or disaster resulting from (inter alia) negligent navigation, the cargo-owners shall not be exempted from liability for contribution in general average, but with the shipowner shall contribute as if such danger, damage, or disaster had not resulted from negligent navigation. The facts show that the shipowner had fulfilled the condition imposed upon him by this clause; that is, he had "exercised due diligence to make said ship in all respects seaworthy and properly manned, equipped and supplied." The question presented for solution turns upon the effect of the third section of the act of Congress approved February 13, 1893, c. 105, 27 Stat. 445 (U.S. Comp. Stat., 1901, p. 2946), known as the Harter Act, and of the decision of this court in the case of The Irrawaddy, 171 U.S. 187.

Prior to the Harter Act it was established that a common carrier by sea could not by any agreement in the bill of lading exempt himself from responding to the owner of cargo for damages arising from the negligence of the master or crew of the vessel. Liverpool & G.W. Steam Co. v. Phenix Ins. Co., 129 U.S. 397, 438; following New York C. Railroad Co. v. Lockwood, 17 Wall. 357.

But of course the responsibilities of the carrier were subject to modification by law, and with respect to vessels transporting merchandise from or between ports of the United States and foreign ports they were substantially

[ 225 U.S. Page 50]

     modified by the Harter Act. The first three sections of this enactment are pertinent to the present discussion and are set forth in full in the margin.*fn1

Section 1 deals with the shipowner's responsibility for the proper loading, stowage, custody, care and delivery of the cargo, prohibits the insertion in any bill of lading of an agreement relieving him from responsibility for negligence in respect to these duties, and declares such agreements null and void. Section 2 prohibits the insertion in any bill of lading of an agreement lessening or avoiding the obligation of the shipowner to "exercise due diligence (to) properly equip, man, provision and outfit said vessel and to make said vessel seaworthy," etc. Section 3 proceeds to limit the responsibility of a shipowner who shall have exercised due diligence to make his vessel seaworthy and properly manned, equipped and supplied. Instead of merely sanctioning covenants and agreements limiting his liability, Congress went further

[ 225 U.S. Page 51]

     and rendered such agreements unnecessary by repealing the liability itself, declaring that if the shipowner should exercise due diligence to make the vessel in all respects seaworthy, and properly manned, equipped and supplied, neither the vessel, her owner or owners, etc., should be responsible for damage or loss resulting from faults or errors in navigation or in the management of the vessel, etc., etc. The antithesis is worth noting. Congress says to the shipowner -- "In certain respects you shall not be relieved from the responsibilities incident to your public occupation as a common carrier, although the cargo owners agree that you shall be ...


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