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INTERSTATE COMMERCE COMMISSION ET AL. v. COLUMBUS & GREENVILLE RAILWAY CO.

decided: June 7, 1943.

INTERSTATE COMMERCE COMMISSION ET AL
v.
COLUMBUS & GREENVILLE RAILWAY CO.



APPEAL FROM THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE UNITED STATES FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF MISSISSIPPI.

Stone, Roberts, Black, Reed, Frankfurter, Douglas, Murphy, Jackson, Rutledge

Author: Jackson

[ 319 U.S. Page 552]

 MR. JUSTICE JACKSON delivered the opinion of the Court.

This case is here on direct appeal from a decree of a specially constituted District Court of three judges*fn1 enjoining the enforcement of an order of the Interstate Commerce Commission canceling certain "cut-backs" on cottonseed and its products contained in appellee's I. C. C. Tariff No. 81.*fn2

The appellee operates 168 miles of railway extending east and west within the State of Mississippi. Cottonseed and its products, to which the tariff in question relates, are important items of traffic in the region, and there are cottonseed mills at a number of points on appellee's line. Appellee originates about 15 or 20 per cent of the cottonseed milled there; trucks originate about 50 per cent; and the balance comes to the mills on other lines with which the appellee connects at these points, including the Illinois Central Railroad Company, the Mobile & Ohio Railroad Company, the St. Louis-San Francisco Railroad Company, and the Yazoo & Mississippi Valley Railway Company.

Since 1931, these railroads and appellee have maintained a system of cut-backs originally designed, and successively revised, for the purpose of meeting the competition of truck lines. Speaking generally, the system permitted one who shipped cottonseed into the mill point and paid the full local rate for that inbound haul to receive back part of the amount so paid if he later shipped the product outbound by the same carrier. If the outbound haul was not by the carrier that had made the inbound haul, he was not entitled to the cut-back.

[ 319 U.S. Page 553]

     To better its position with respect to the outbound hauls of cottonseed originated by other lines, appellee took measures which it calls "self-help to meet competition." It sought by its I. C. C. Tariff No. 81 to establish schedules of payments to shippers which would give them the benefit of the cut-backs on cottonseed and its products shipped outbound over its line, whether the inbound haul was over its own line or over a connecting line. This tariff was neither protested nor suspended, and became effective October 16, 1938. After the Commission's Bureau of Traffic had criticized this tariff and requested its correction, appellee filed its I. C. C. Tariff No. 83, differing in immaterial particulars from its Tariff No. 81. The Commission ordered No. 83 suspended and entered upon an investigation of its lawfulness.*fn3

In its report,*fn4 Division 3 of the Commission held: The suspended tariff was an effort to reduce the outbound joint rates, established to points beyond appellee's line with the concurrence of the participating carriers, without obtaining their concurrence in such reduction, and therefore it violated § 6 (4) of the Act.*fn5 The suspended schedules did not "lawfully name or provide any legal rates whatsoever,"*fn6 and were in violation of § 6 (7),*fn7 since the contemplated

[ 319 U.S. Page 554]

     "refund would be, essentially, a rebate, whereby the property would be transported from the mill point to the destination on another line at a lower rate than that named in the joint tariff published and filed by the several carriers participating in the movement and lawfully in effect. . . . Respondent's suspended tariff, granting an alleged allowance to the shipper notwithstanding that he performs no part of the transportation service, as the result of which he would obtain the out-bound transportation at less than the rates lawfully in effect would constitute an unreasonable practice, in violation of section 1 (6)*fn8 and other provisions of the Interstate Commerce Act."*fn9 Although not shown to be unlawful as applied to traffic originated and carried to the mills by appellee over its line, the tariff was defective in the proposed form, and should be cancelled.

The Commission then of its own motion entered upon an investigation of the lawfulness of appellee's I. C. C. Tariff No. 81, which had remained in effect as ...


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